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Understanding and Connecting 

Shape  - Scavenger Shape Hunt

The purpose of this activity is to develop geometry and spatial sense through the practice of recognising and describing different shapes in their environment. Metacognition is encouraged by having students focus and pay attention to the task of finding different shapes.

Progression Continua

Element

Understanding and Connecting

a
The learner

Explores shapes in the environment.

b
The learner

Identifies and recognises shapes in the environment.

04.

c
The learner

Identifies and describes simple geometrical properties of some shapes.

 

Recognises and names common 3-D and 2-D shapes in different orientations.

d

Identifies 2-D shapes as the faces of 3-D solids.

 

Explores the combinations of shapes to create 2-D and 3-D models [taking into consideration their unique properties].

e
The learner

Compares properties [faces, sides, corners, vertices] of shapes.

 

Models 2-D and 3-D shapes using materials or through drawing.

f
The learner

Recognises square and non-square corners in the environment, identifying square corners as right angles, or a quarter of a turn.

Dissects and/ or constructs 3-D shapes using modelling materials.

04.

g
The learner

Explores and investigates properties of shapes including symmetry, lines and angles.

 

Analyses properties of shapes (For example: The nature of lines and angles)

Grading Rubric - What learners can typically do

Element

Understanding and Connecting

d
The learner

Identifies 2-D shapes as the faces of 3-D objects in their environment.

The picture shows a road with sign shapes

What shapes can you see?

e
The learner

Is able to identify shapes within shapes.

The picture shows a building with shape windows

How many shapes can you see?

04.

f
The learner

Recognises right, acute, obtuse, and reflex angles in 3-D objects.

The picture shows a staircase and its angles

What kind of angles do you see?

04.

g
The learner

Names 2-D shapes in non-prototypical settings and identifies their properties such as lines and angles.

The picture shows a wall with some shapes and lines

How many shapes are there?

What are the shapes and lines?

This activity can be extended by engaging students in writing their own mathematical story based on Shape and Space.

 

You might like to read the story of Shapestown written by Bronagh, Catherine, Katya, Kevin, Laura, Lynn, Marie, Michaela, Niamh, Saja, and have your own students engage in the task afterwards.

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